Your Body Will Forgive You

Every woman has her own reasons for smoking. Every woman can find her own way of quitting and staying smoke-free— in her own time.

30 minutes after you quit: blood pressure, heart rate, and the temperature of your hands and feet become normal.
12 hours after you quit: carbon monoxide and oxygen levels in the blood return to normal.
48 hours after you quit: your sense of taste and smell start to return to normal levels.
72 hours after you quit: bronchial tubes relax and breathing is easier.
1 week after you quit: nicotine is flushed from your body.
2 weeks after you quit: circulation, breathing, and lung function improve.
1 month after you quit: coughing, sinus congestion, and shortness of breath decrease.
2 years after you quit: your risk of heart attack drops to that of a woman who has never smoked.
5 years after you quit: your risk of stroke drops to normal; risk of lung cancer decreases by half.
10 years after you quit: the risk of most types of cancer drops to normal.
20 years after you quit: the risk of dying due to smoking-related causes is similar to that of women who have never smoked!

Adapted from: Holmberg-Schwartz, D. (1997) Catching our breath: A journal about change for women who smoke. Winnipeg, MB: Women’s Health Clinic. and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2004) The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health.

Back to Liz's Story

  • Every Woman has her own reasons for smoking.
  • Every woman can find her own way of quitting and staying smoke-free-in her own time.